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Science

Primary

EYFS

In the Nursery and Reception students experience science in a very practical way. They investigate and experiment with a variety of materials. They are assessed against the early learning outcomes.

Key Stage One

InYears 1 and 2, students learn science through the Edison Learning Curriculum, a topic-based programme. This is linked to the National Curriculum. There is an annual Science Week with a subject co-ordinator based at secondary.

Yr 1

Why do we play with different toys as we grow older?

Science Y1

Every day Materials

Animals including humans

 

Hello, I am new here;  Bonjour, je suis nouveau ici

Science Y1

Plants

Animals including humans

Seasonal change

 

 

What can we learn about our world from stories?

Science Y1

Every day Materials

distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made, identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock

describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials, compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Seasonal change

Why is water so precious?

Science Y1

Plants

Animals including Humans

Seasonal Changes

 

Yr2

Can Party Food be Healthy?

“Which materials would make good party decorations?

Y1/2 Science Everyday Materials

What is the best way for Mrs Armitage to travel

identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses

What makes us like other animals?

Living things and their habitats

Plants

Animals including Humans

 

 

Key Stage Two

In Years 3-6, students learn science through the Edison Learning Curriculum, a topic based programme. This is linked to the National Curriculum. There is an anuual Science Week with a subject coordinator based at secondary.

Yr 3

How does electricity work?

Electricity

Forces & Magnets

Working Scientifically

 

 

Let’s go on an adventure. Would we like to visit Guatemala?

Forces & Friction

Measuring forces

Pulling objects

(Air resistance Y5)

Working scientifically

 

Are bugs important?

Science Y3/4 Animals including humans

Y3 Plants

Y4 Living things and their habitats

Working scientifically

 

 

Yr 4

How do I see? How do I hear?

Light & Sound

Working scientifically

 

 

Should we stop eating chocolate?

Chocolate

D&T design, make, evaluate

Y4 Science States of Matter

Working scientifically

What happens inside us?

Y3/4 Science

Y3/4 Animals including humans

Working scientifically

Yr 5

 

What is it made of?

Mysterious Materials

Context Testing materials for companies

Properties and changes to materials

Working scientifically

 

Fairground

D&T design, make, evaluate

Y6 Electricity

Y6 Light

Y5 Forces

Working scientifically

 

Do we make the most of what’s right on our doorstep?

Y5 Living things and their habitats

Y5 animals including humans 

Working scientifically

Yr 6

What’s out there?

Out of This World

Y5 Science

Earth & Space

Working scientifically

Y5 Forces

 

Let’s Go Round Again – Year 6 Science revisit

Y6 Electricity & Light

Why do some creatures no longer exist?

Evolution & inheritance

 

Y6 Living things and their habitats

Y5/6 Animals including humans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secondary

Years 7, 8 and 9

Students study a variety of topics from biology, chemistry and physics throughout Years 7 and 8. Where possible they do so using practical investigations to help develop their ability to work scientifically.  In Year 9 students begin a bridging year where they start to cover the topics from AQA GCSE combined science.

Topics studied and content covered include:

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

In Year 7, all students start to study a small course named ‘working scientifically’. This short course will equip new students with the essential scientific skills they will need to investigate the topics studied. All students will then study and investigate through practical activities the three different scientific disciplines; biology, chemistry and physics. Units include; cell structure and functions of body systems, reproduction, elements, atoms, and compounds, forces, space, sound and light. Students are tested regularly to ensure subject knowledge is at a satisfactory standard in order to progress to the next stage of learning.

In Year 8, students will have the opportunity to consolidate their learning from Year 7 through a more independent approach with many practical investigations. Topics include; electricity and magnetism, motion and pressure, periodic table, separation techniques, ecosystems, adaptation and inheritance. Students are once again tested regular after each topic to check understanding. Many of the topics studied in this year will appear in their GCSE course.

 

 

 

 

In Year 9 students start to study the topics needed for GCSE combined science following the AQA specification:

Cell biology

Organisation

Atomic structure and the periodic table

Bonding, structure and the properties of matter

Forces

Energy 

 

Year 10

Course Title: GCSE combined science: trilogy
Exam Board: AQA
Qualification: GCSE (worth two GCSEs)

About the course

This course is for most Year 10 students who have not chosen to use an option to study extra science. Students will study topics in biology, chemistry and physics.  They will also develop their understanding of how to work scientifically. Working scientifically is the sum of all the activities that scientists do.  

How it is assessed

There are six papers: two Biology, two Chemistry and two Physics. Each of the papers will assess knowledge and understanding from distinct topic areas.  Each exam is a written exam lasting 1 hour and 15 minutes.  Students will either sit all higher tier or all foundation tier papers. Each paper has a total of 70 marks and each paper is worth 16.7% of the double aware GCSE. 

Biology topics 1–4: Cell Biology; Organisation; Infection and response; and Bioenergetics.

Biology topics 5–7: Homeostasis and response; Inheritance, variation and evolution; and Ecology.

Chemistry topics 8–12: Atomic structure and the periodic table; Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter; Quantitative chemistry; Chemical changes; and Energy changes.

Chemistry topics 13–17: The rate and extent of chemical change; Organic chemistry; Chemical analysis; Chemistry of the atmosphere; and Using resources.

Physics topics 18–21: Energy; Electricity; Particle model of matter; and Atomic structure.

Physics topics 22–24: Forces; Waves; and Magnetism and electromagnetism

Course Title: GCSE Biology
Exam Board: AQA
Qualification: GCSE

About the course
This course is for Year 10 students who have chosen to use one of their options in additional to their compulsory science lessons to enable them to study three single sciences and who will gain three separate GCSEs for Biology, Chemistry and Physics. As well as studying the content needed students will also develop their understanding of how to work scientifically. Working scientifically is the sum of all the activities that scientists do.    

How it is assessed

There are two exam papers. Each paper will assess knowledge and understanding from distinct topic areas. Each exam is a written exam lasting 1 hour and 45 minutes. Each paper has a total of 100 marks and is worth 50% of the GCSE.

Topics 1 – 4: Cell biology; Organisation; Infection and response; and Bioenergetics.

Topics 5 – 7: Homeostasis and response; Inheritance, variation and evolution; and Ecology.

Course Title: GCSE Chemistry
Exam Board: AQA
Qualification: GCSE

About the course
This course is for Year 10 students who have chosen to use one of their options in additional to their compulsory science lessons to enable them to study three single sciences and who will gain three separate GCSEs for Biology, Chemistry and Physics. As well as studying the content needed students will also develop their understanding of how to work scientifically. Working scientifically is the sum of all the activities that scientists do.   

How it is assessed

There are two exam papers. Each paper will assess knowledge and understanding from distinct topic areas. Each exam is a written exam lasting 1 hour and 45 minutes. Each paper has a total of 100 marks and is worth 50% of the GCSE.

Topics 1–5: Atomic structure and the periodic table; Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter; Quantitative chemistry, Chemical changes; and Energy changes.

Topics 6–10: The rate and extent of chemical change; Organic chemistry; Chemical analysis, Chemistry of the atmosphere; and Using resources.

Course Title: GCSE Physics
Exam Board: AQA
Qualification: GCSE

About the course
This course is for Year 10 students who have chosen to use one of their options in additional to their compulsory science lessons to enable them to study three single sciences and who will gain three separate GCSEs for Biology, Chemistry and Physics. As well as studying the content needed students will also develop their understanding of how to work scientifically. Working scientifically is the sum of all the activities that scientists do.   

How it is assessed

There are two exam papers. Each paper will assess knowledge and understanding from distinct topic areas. Each exam is a written exam lasting 1 hour and 45 minutes. Each paper has a total of 100 marks and is worth 50% of the GCSE.

Topics 1-4: Energy; Electricity; Particle model of matter; and Atomic structure.

Topics 5-8: Forces; Waves; Magnetism and electromagnetism; and Space physics.

Further information on the AQA science courses

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/science/gcse

Year 11

Course Title: GCSE Science
Exam Board: Edexcel
Qualification: GCSE

About the course
This course is for Year 11 students who have not chosen to use one of their options in addition to their compulsory science lessons.  Some Year 11 students gained this qualification in Year 10, others are studying it in year 11. As well as studying the content needed students will also develop their understanding of how to work scientifically. Working scientifically is the sum of all the activities that scientists do.   

Unit B1

  • Classification, variation and inheritance
  • Responses to a changing environment
  • Problems of, and solutions to a changing environment

Unit C1

  • The Earth’s sea and atmosphere
  • Materials from the Earth
  • Acids
  • Obtaining and using metals
  • Fuels

Unit P1

  • Visible light and the Solar System
  • The electromagnetic spectrum
  • Waves and the Universe
  • Waves and the Earth
  • Generation and transmission of electricity
  • Energy and the future

How it is assessed

Students sit three written exams each lasting for one hour for units B1, C1 and P1.  Each exam will have a total of 60 marks and is worth 25% of the GCSE.  Students can sit higher or foundation tier papers for the exams and do not have to sit all Higher or all Foundation.  Students must also complete a controlled assessment during normal science lessons which is also worth 25% of the GCSE.  There are three controlled assessments available, students can complete both and submit the best marks for each section. 

Course Title: GCSE Additional Science
Exam Board: Edexcel
Qualification: GCSE

About the course
This course is for some of the Year 11 students who have not chosen to use one of their options in addition to their normal science lessons. Some students will take this qualification in addition to GCSE science.   As well as studying the content needed students will also develop their understanding of how to work scientifically. Working scientifically is the sum of all the activities that scientists do.   

Unit B2

  • The building blocks of cells
  • Organisms and energy
  • Common systems

Unit C2

  • Atomic structure and the periodic table
  • Ionic compounds and analysis
  • Covalent compounds and separation techniques
  • Groups in the periodic table
  • Chemical reactions
  • Quantitative chemistry

Unit P2

  • Static and current electricity
  • Controlling and using electric current
  • Motion and forces
  • Momentum, energy, work and power
  • Nuclear fission and nuclear fusion
  • Advantages and disadvantages of using radioactive materials

How it is assessed

Students will sit three written exams each lasting for one hour for units B1, C1 and P1.  Each exam will have a total of 60 marks and is worth 25% of the GCSE.  Students can sit Higher or Foundation tier papers for the exams and do not have to sit all Higher or all Foundation.  Students must also complete a controlled assessment during compulsory science lessons which is also worth 25% of the GCSE.  There are three controlled assessments available, students can complete both and submit the best marks for each section. 

Course Title: GCSE Biology
Exam Board: Edexcel
Qualification: GCSE

About the course
This course is for Year 11 students who have chosen to use one of their options in addition to their compulsory science lessons to enable them to study three separate sciences and who will gain three separate GCSEs for Biology, Chemistry and Physics. As well as studying the content needed students will also develop their understanding of how to work scientifically. Working scientifically is the sum of all the activities that scientists do.   

Unit B1

  • Classification, variation and inheritance
  • Responses to a changing environment
  • Problems of, and solutions to a changing environment

Unit B2

  • The building blocks of cells
  • Organisms and energy
  • Common systems

Unit B3

  • Control systems
  • Behaviour
  • Biotechnology

How it is assessed

Students will sit three written exams each lasting for one hour for units B1, B2 and B3.  Each exam will have a total of 60 marks and is worth 25% of the GCSE.  Students can sit higher or foundation tier papers for the exams and do not have to sit all higher or all foundation.  Students must also complete a controlled assessment during compulsory science lessons which is also worth 25% of the GCSE.  There are two controlled assessments available, students can complete both and submit the best marks for each section. 

Course Title: GCSE Chemistry
Exam Board: Edexcel
Qualification: GCSE

About the course
This course is for Year 11 students who have chosen to use one of their options in additional to their compulsory science lessons to enable them to study three separate sciences and who will gain three separate GCSEs for Biology, Chemistry and Physics. As well as studying the content needed students will also develop their understanding of how to work scientifically. Working scientifically is the sum of all the activities that scientists do.   

Unit C1

  • The Earth’s sea and atmosphere
  • Materials from the Earth
  • Acids
  • Obtaining and using metals
  • Fuels


Unit C2

  • Atomic structure and the periodic table
  • Ionic compounds and analysis
  • Covalent compounds and separation techniques
  • Groups in the periodic table
  • Chemical reactions
  • Quantitative chemistry

Unit C3

  • Qualitative analysis
  • Quantitative analysis
  • Electrolytic processes
  • Gases, equilibria and ammonia
  • Organic chemistry


How it is assessed

Students will sit three written exams each lasting for one hour for units C1, C2 and C3.  Each exam will have a total of 60 marks and is worth 25% of the GCSE.  Students can sit Higher or Foundation tier papers for the exams and do not have to sit all Higher or all Foundation.  Students must also complete a controlled assessment during normal science lessons which is also worth 25% of the GCSE.  There are two controlled assessments available, students can complete both and submit the best marks for each section. 


Course Title: GCSE Physics
Exam Board: Edexcel
Qualification: GCSE

About the course
This course is for Year 11 students who have chosen to use one of their options in additional to their compulsory science lessons to enable them to study three separate sciences and who will gain three separate GCSEs for biology, chemistry and physics. As well as studying the content needed students will also develop their understanding of how to work scientifically. Working scientifically is the sum of all the activities that scientists do.   

Unit P1

  • Visible light and the Solar System
  • The electromagnetic spectrum
  • Waves and the Universe
  • Waves and the Earth
  • Generation and transmission of electricity
  • Energy and the future

Unit P2

  • Static and current electricity
  • Controlling and using electric current
  • Motion and forces
  • Momentum, energy, work and power
  • Nuclear fission and nuclear fusion
  • Advantages and disadvantages of using radioactive materials

Unit P3

  • Radiation in treatment and medicine
  • X-rays and ECGs
  • Production, uses and risks of ionising radiation from radioactive sources
  • Motion of particles
  • Kinetic theory and gases

How it is assessed

Students will sit three written exams each lasting for one hour for units P1, P2 and P3.  Each exam will have a total of 60 marks and is worth 25% of the GCSE.  Students can sit Higher or Foundation tier papers for the exams and do not have to sit all higher or all foundation.  Students must also complete a controlled assessment during normal science lessons which is also worth 25% of the GCSE.  There are two controlled assessments available, students can complete both and submit the best marks for each section. 

For further information on the individual Edexcel science GCSEs that Year 11 are studying: http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/science-2011-individual.html#tab-2

Sixth Form

Years 12 & 13

Students can study A levels in Biology, Chemistry and Physics at Merchants’ Academy.

Course Title: Biology
Exam Board: OCR
Qualification: AS/A level Biology A (Advancing Biology)

Course Content Overview

Module 1 – Development of practical skills in Biology
Module 2 – Foundations in Biology
Module 3 – Exchange and transport
Module 4 – Biodiversity, evolution and disease
Module 5 – Communication, homeostasis and energy
Module 6 – Genetics, evolution and ecosystems

Module 1. – Development of practical skills in Biology
Overview of content: Skills of planning, implementing, analysis and evaluation.

Module 2 – Foundations in Biology

Overview of content: Cell structure; Biological molecules; Nucleotides and nucleic acids; Enzymes; Biological membranes; Cell division, cell diversity and cellular organisation.

Module 3 – Exchange and transport

Overview of content: Exchange surfaces, Transport in animals, Transport in plants.

Module 4 – Biodiversity, evolution and disease

Overview of content: Communicable diseases, disease prevention and the immune system, Biodiversity , Classification and evolution.

Module 5 – Communication, homeostasis and energy

Overview of content: Communication and homeostasis, Excretion as an example of homeostatic control, communication, Hormonal communication, Plant and animal responses, Photosynthesis, Respiration.

Module 6 – Genetics, evolution and ecosystems

Overview of content: Cellular control, Patterns of inheritance, Manipulating genomes, Cloning and biotechnology, Ecosystems, Populations and sustainability.

How each module is assessed

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For further information:
http://ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-biology-a-h020-h420-from-2015/#

Course Title: Chemistry A
Exam Board: OCR
Qualification: AS/A Level

About the course
Chemistry is an essential qualification for a large number of careers as well as being an excellent subject to study alongside any other A Level.

In the first year of Chemistry students will cover topics such as practical lab skills, atomic structure, the periodic table and its reactions, bonding, energetics, organic chemistry, environmental chemistry and much more. In the second year students will take their understanding further to include further ideas in physical chemistry as well as expand  understanding of all the functional groups in organic chemistry.

Overview of content

Students study:

  • Module 1 – Development of practical skills in chemistry
  • Module 2 – Foundations in chemistry
  • Module 3 – Periodic table and energy
  • Module 4 – Core organic chemistry
  • Module 5 – Physical chemistry and transition elements
  • Module 6 – Organic chemistry and analysis

Component 1: 

Overview of content: Periodic table, elements and physical chemistry

Contribution to final grade: 37%

How it is assessed 2 hours 15 minutes written paper

Component 2: 

Overview of content: Synthesis and analytical techniques

Contribution to final grade: 37%

How it is assessed 2 hours 15 minutes written paper

Component 3: 

Overview of content: Unified chemistry

Contribution to final grade: 26%

How it is assessed 1 hour 30 minutes written paper

For further information: http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-chemistry-a-h032-h432-from-2015/

Course Title: A Level in Physics A
Exam Board: OCR
Qualification: A level

About the course

Physics A – a content-led approach. A flexible approach where the specification is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of physics. As students progress through the course they will build on their knowledge of the laws of Physics, applying their understanding to solve problems on topics ranging from sub-atomic particles to the entire universe. For A level only, the Practical Endorsement will also support the development of practical skills.

Overview of content

Students study content which is split into six teaching modules:

  • Module 1 – Development of practical skills in physics
  • Module 2 – Foundations of physics
  • Module 3 – Forces and motion
  • Module 4 – Electrons, waves and photons
  • Module 5 – Newtonian world and astrophysics
  • Module 6 – Particles and medical physics

Component 1:  Modelling physics

Overview of content
This component is worth 100 marks and is split into two sections and assesses content from teaching modules 1, 2, 3 and 5. Learners answer all questions.
Section A contains multiple choice questions. This section of the paper is worth 15 marks. Section B includes short answer question styles (structured questions, problem solving, calculations, practical) and extended response questions. This section of the paper is worth 85 marks.

Contribution to final grade: 37%

How it is assessed
External Examination

Component 2:  Exploring physics

Overview of content
This component is worth 100 marks and is split into two sections and assesses content from teaching modules 1, 2, 4 and 6. Learners answer all questions.
Section A contains multiple choice questions. This section of the paper is worth 15 marks. Section B includes short answer question styles (structured questions, problem solving, calculations, practical) and extended response questions. This section of the paper is worth 85 marks.

Contribution to final grade: 37%

How it is assessed
External Examination

Component 3:  Unified physics

Overview of content: This component assesses content from across all teaching modules 1 to 6. Learners answer all questions. This component is worth 70 marks. Question styles include short answer (structured questions, problem solving, calculations, practical) and extended response questions.

Contribution to final grade: 37%

How it is assessed
External Examination

Component 4:  Practical endorsement in physics

Overview of content
Performance in this component is reported separately to the performance in the A level as measured through externally assessed components 01 to 03. This non-exam assessment component rewards the development of practical competency for physics and is teacher assessed.

Students complete a minimum of 12 assessed experiments covering the technical skills (together with the use of apparatus and practical techniques) specified in Section 5h. Learners may work in groups but must be able to demonstrate and record independent evidence of their competency. Teachers who award a pass to their learners need to be confident that the learner consistently and routinely exhibits the competencies listed in Section 5h before completion of the A level course.

Contribution to final grade: Nil

How it is assessed
Internal observations and assessment by teachers

Further information: scienceGCE@ocr.org.uk